Day of Remembrance

 

January 25, 2018

 

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On Jan. 25, NASA paid tribute to the crews of Apollo 1 and space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, as well as other NASA colleagues who lost their lives while furthering the cause of exploration and discovery, during the agency's annual Day of Remembrance.

 

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Explorer 1: The Beginning of American Space Science

 

January 23, 2018

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Sixty years ago next week, the hopes of Cold War America soared into the night sky as a rocket lofted skyward above Cape Canaveral, a soon-to-be-famous barrier island off the Florida coast.

The date was Jan. 31, 1958. NASA had yet to be formed, and the honor of this first flight belonged to the U.S. Army. The rocket's sole payload was a javelin-shaped satellite built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Explorer 1, as it would soon come to be called, was America's first satellite.

 

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

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What Scientists Can Learn About the Moon
During the Jan. 31 Eclipse

 

January 23, 2018

 

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The lunar eclipse on Jan. 31 will give a team of scientists a special opportunity to study the Moon using the astronomer’s equivalent of a heat-sensing, or thermal, camera.

Three lunar events will come together in an unusual overlap that’s being playfully called a super blue blood moon. The second full moon in January will take place on the 31st, making it the first blue moon of 2018. It also will be considered a supermoon — one that appears slightly larger and brighter than usual because it occurs when the Moon is near its perigee, or the closest point in its orbit to Earth.

 

Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

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Orion Spacecraft Recovery Rehearsal Underway

 

 

Click Here for a larger imageJanuary 19, 2018

 

NASA’s new deep space exploration systems will send crew 40,000 miles beyond the Moon, and return them safely home. After traveling through space at 25,000 miles per hour, the Orion spacecraft will slow to 300 mph after it passes through the Earth’s atmosphere. The spacecraft then slows down to 20 mph before it safely splashes down in the Pacific Ocean.

 

 

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

 

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